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Battle of the Somme Centenary - Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This month, Cambridge Scholars Publishing is proud to commemorate the centenary of the Battle of the Somme. Numerous events are planned to remember those who gave their lives during the Battle of the Somme (1st July-18th November 1916), one of the most costly battles of the entire war, and 10,000 people are expected to attend the service of remembrance at Thiepval including heads of state and members of royal families.

In 2014, for the First World War centenary, Cambridge Scholars were among the thousands who wrote a letter to an unknown soldier, and this year members of the public have been participating in a project to create the ‘Path of the Remembered’ to commemorate all those who played their part in the Battle of the Somme. For more information, click here.

To mark the Battle of the Somme Centenary, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on 4 of our best-selling titles on World War I. To find out more about each title, click on the image.

In his ground-breaking The Great War and Modern Memory, Paul Fussell claimed that “the dynamics and iconography of the Great War have proved crucial political, rhetorical, and artistic determinants on subsequent life.” Forty years after Fussell’s study, the contributors to this volume reconsider whether the myth generated by World War I is still “part of the fiber of [people’s] lives”. What is the place of the First World War in cultural memory today? How have the literary means for remembering the war changed since the war? Can anything new be learned from the effort to re-imagine the First World War after other bloody conflicts of the 20th century? A variety of answers to these questions are provided in Re-Imagining the First World War: New Perspectives in Anglophone Literature and Culture, which explores the Great War in British, Irish, Canadian, Australian, and (post)colonial contexts. The contributors to this collection write about the war from a literary perspective, reinterpreting poetry, fiction, letters, and essays created during or shortly after the war, exploring contemporary discourses of commemoration, and presenting in-depth studies of complex conceptual issues, such as gender and citizenship.

The First World War: Analysis and Interpretation, Volume 1 is the result of an international conference held at Sapienza University of Rome in June 2014, which brought together scholars from different countries to re-analyse and re-interpret the events of the First World War, one hundred years after a young Bosnian Serb student from the “Mlada Bosna,” Gavrilo Princip, “lit the fuse” and ignited the conflict which was to forever change the world. This book provides new insights into theories of the conflict, and is characterized by internationality, interdisciplinarity and a combination of different research methods. The contributions, based on archival documents from various different countries, international and local historiography, and on the analysis of newspaper articles, postcards, propaganda material, memorials and school books, examine ideological and historiographical debates, the memory of the war and its most important contemporary and popular narratives, and the use of propaganda for the mobilization of public opinion, in addition to military, social, political, economic and psychological aspects of the conflict.

The First World War: Analysis and Interpretation, Volume 2 is the result of an international conference held at Sapienza University of Rome in June 2014, which brought together scholars from different countries to re-analyse and re-interpret the events of the First World War, one hundred years after a young Bosnian Serb student from the “Mlada Bosna,” Gavrilo Princip, “lit the fuse” and ignited the conflict which was to forever change the world. This book provides new insights into theories of the conflict, and is characterized by internationality, interdisciplinarity and a combination of different research methods. The contributions, based on archival documents from various different countries, international and local historiography, and on the analysis of newspaper articles, postcards, propaganda material, memorials and school books, examine the role of intellectuals and artists in the conflict, the issue of minorities and nationalities, the economy, and international relations and politics, in addition to specific case studies such as Russia and the Ottoman Empire, the Caucasus and the Middle East.

The First World War was one of the prime motors of social change in modern British history. Culture and technology at all levels were transformed. The growing impact of the state, the introduction of modern democracy and change in political allegiance affected most aspects of the lives of UK citizens. Whilst most of the current centenary interest focuses on military aspects of the conflict, The Great War: Localities and Regional Identities considers how these fundamental changes varied from locality to locality within Britain’s Home Front. Taken together, did they drastically alter the long-established importance of regional variations within British society in the early twentieth century? Was there a common national response to these unprecedented events, or did strong regional identities cause significant variations? The series of case studies presented in this volume – ranging geographically and by topic – detail how communities coped with the war’s outbreak, its upheavals, its unprecedented mass mobilization on all fronts, and its unforeseen longevity.


To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code SOMME16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st August 2016.


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