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Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ - January 2020

Our reviewer for January’s ‘Recommended Read’ is Professor Christina Alexandris, Associate Professor in Computational Linguistics and German Linguistics at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in Greece. Kristina has been a member of our Telecommunications Editorial Advisory Board since February 2018.


Her chosen title, News Discourse and Digital Currents: A Corpus-Based Genre Analysis of News Tickers by Antonio Fruttaldo, focuses on an examination of the graphic elements during news broadcasts. 

Cambridge Scholars are offering a 50% discount on Christina’s choice until February 2nd. You can redeem the discount by using the code ‘EABJAN20’ on our website when purchasing the book.

In recent years, journalistic practices have undergone a radical change due to the increasing pressure of new digital media on professional practice. The ever-growing development of new technologies and the ceaseless fluctuation of social practices have challenged some of the traditional genres found in these professional contexts. On this basis, the book investigates the genre of tickers used by BBC World News over a year-long period.


You can read Christina’s review below:

“The book combines corpus linguistics and genre analysis in news discourse with digital currents in media discourse, including graphic elements in TV news broadcasts and the reshaping of media conventions. The extended analysis, corpus collection and description of media discourse is based on corpus linguistics and genre analysis of corpus. Special emphasis is placed on news tickers, with a significant amount of empirical data.

Although standard practices and approaches of corpus analysis are employed, they are also challenged, since the present analysis concerns recent developments and the state-of-the-art in TV news broadcasts. Various features of the state-of-the-art in TV news broadcasts are described in detail, providing a rich variety of examples and data, including texts from popular national and international TV channels and processed output from well-known software.

The analysis is a fresh look on news discourse, combining detailed linguistic approaches with technological factors and examining new and multiple dimensions of TV news broadcasts. It is a remarkable source of analytical empirical data and new insights in media discourse, contributing to its better understanding, evaluation, processing and management.”


To learn more about the volume and its editors, to read a sample extract from the text, or to purchase the book with your 50% discount you can follow this link. For more information on our reviewer, you can click here.

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