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Picture of The US and the World We Inhabit

The US and the World We Inhabit

Editor(s): Paola Loreto, Adele Tiengo, Anastasia Cardonem, Silvia Guslandi

Book Description

Environmental and global outlooks are currently at the center of the most lively and urgent international scholarship. This volume serves to overcome the self-referentiality of American studies by intersecting the study of American literature and history with the questions and concerns raised by these perspectives. It re-conceptualizes the mutual and shifting positions of center(s) and margin(s), and subject(s) and object(s) in terms of relation and an inclusive structure of relations based on an ecological ethics. The contributions here explore many methodological hypotheses, ranging from Christa Greve-Vollp’s work on eco-cosmopolitanism to Peter Bardaglio’s report on US climate activism, as well as the ecocritical and ecofeminist viewpoints of Scott Slovic and Greta Gaard respectively. In addition to contributing to academic discourse, the essays—written by both young and established international scholars, and coherently arranged into four thematic sections—explore topics that are of interest to the broader public. The issues discussed here include identity and new forms of belonging; migration and the environment; ecolanguage, ecopoetry and ecopoetics; translation and multilingualism; animal studies; environmental activism; shifting geographies; and ecofeminism.

Hardback

ISBN-13: 978-1-5275-3937-2
ISBN-10: 1-5275-3937-7
Date of Publication: 01/12/2019
Pages / Size: 349 / A5
Price: £64.99
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Biography

Paola Loreto is Professor of American Literature at the University of Milan, Italy, and holds a PhD in American Studies from the University of Rome III, Italy. She is the author of three book-length studies on Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, and Derek Walcott, and is a specialist in American poetry.

Adele Tiengo obtained her PhD from the University of Milan, Italy, in 2016, with a dissertation on an ecocritical reading of Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam Trilogy. Her most recent publication is “Extreme Places as Sites of Ecological Exploration: Postmodern Wilderness in Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam” in Textus (2017).

Anastasia Cardone has been a PhD Researcher at Leeds University, UK, since October 2017. She works on the representation of birds in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American literature, with a particular focus on Henry David Thoreau.

Silvia Guslandi received her PhD in Anglo-American Comparative Literature from the University of Genoa, Italy, in 2016. She is currently a PhD candidate in Romance Languages and Literatures at the University of Chicago, USA, and her publications include the Italian edition of John Dos Passos’s War Journals.